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Produce More, Consume Less: A year and a half later

By Nick at July 28, 2013 16:31
Filed Under: Personal, Delphi, General

On January 1, 2012 – a year and a half ago – I wrote the this post called “Produce More, Consume Less”.  In it I discussed a bunch of stuff that I wanted to do in the coming year.  I thought it might be fun to review and see how I am doing on those things:

Write a substantive post on my blog once a week.

I did well with this for a while, but recently, I haven’t blogged much because I’ve been working on my book.  (See below).  In addition, 2012 ended up being a difficult year for the Hodges household, and so the blogging didn’t get done as much as I would have liked.  However, I think I have posted a pretty good chunk of content over the last year and a half.

Find an open source project and work on it.

Here I have fallen down.  I’ve wanted for a long time to write /// documentation for the Spring Framework, but I haven’t really done that.  I have created a good collection of Delphi code demos on BitBucket, but I’m not sure we can really call that an “open source project”.  I will put effort into the Spring for Delphi documentation moving forward, I promise.

I’m going to get off my butt and walk.

I did…okay here.  I walked a lot with my wife.  Recently, however, this has tapered off quite a bit, and I’m sorry to say that I’m as heavy as I’ve ever been.  However, in just the last two days, I’ve started a determined effort to start running again.  I ran track and cross-country in college (though you can tell it was a very, very long time ago just by looking at me) and I’d like to be a runner again.  I’m determined this time.  We’ll see.  Actually, I have to because if I don’t, I’m headed for a heart attack.  Seriously.   

I’m going to write a book on coding in Delphi.

Well, I didn’t get it done in 2012, but I’m currently working hard on it and hope to have it done this year instead.  I’m nearly done with all the chapters for the first draft, and am looking more closely into how to get a cover, get it ready for publishing, etc.  I’m setting my sites on publishing it by the end of the year.

I’m going to be deliberate and purposeful in what I read. 

I think I have done pretty well here.  I made a list of books that I wanted to read and have read them, both novels and technical books. (I got an Amazon Kindle Paperwhite for Christmas, and I’ve read my books on it almost exclusively)   I’ve read a lot, and have a good list of “to read” books.  On the Internet side, I’ve pared down my collection of RSS feeds quite a bit, and spend time reading only those that are really important (like the blog of my wife and proofreader, ipaintiwrite). By the way, with the demise of Google Reader, I’ve switched over to The Old Reader for tracking my RSS feeds.

I’m going to be deliberate and plan any [TV and Movie] watching I do. 

Here I’ve done very well.  I don’t watch much TV anymore at all, and when I do, I deliberately choose what to watch and do so.  For instance, I recently finished up “Orange is the New Black” on Netflix, having decided deliberately to watch it.  I also watched “House of Cards”.  I can’t remember the last time I just sat down and randomly picked something to watch on TV.  As for Movies, I’ve seen most of the blockbusters in the theatre and watched almost no movies on DVD, Netflix, etc.  I’m pleased with how this is going.

I’m going to remove FreeCell from my phone.

I did this, as well as removed all other games from my phone. Other than playing Words with Friends at lunch with my co-workers (we are pretty obsessive about it), I’ve done really well here. I have spent very little time playing games, and when I have, it’s  been with my son for some good bonding time.

I’m going to spend time selling stuff on eBay.

This has been average.  I have sold some items, as well as donated a lot of things to charity.  I still have stuff that I’d like to sell, but haven’t really made a big dent in the large amount of “stuff” that I own.  I’d like to have less stuff, and so I’ll have to get after this.

Overall, after a year and a half, it’s not bad, but not great.  Losing weight, getting in shape, and publishing my book are at the top of the list going forward. 

Stuff I’ve Been Reading And Watching

By Nick at January 12, 2013 10:50
Filed Under: Delphi, General

Flotsam and Jetsam #71

By Nick at December 26, 2012 10:40
Filed Under: Delphi, Flotsam and Jetsam, General, Software Development
  • I’ve shamelessly tweeted it a couple of times, and I’ll promote it here as well – I’ve created a Bookstore page here containing a list of books that I think are must-reads for all developers.  What books would you add to the list?
  • Have you upgraded to Delphi XE3 yet? If you haven't, please do.
  • Okay, I need some advice:  I want to learn a functional programming language, but which one?  Clojure?  Haskell? F#?  What? 
  • I need some more advice:  I have a good working knowledge of SQL and SQL Server.  But I’m going to need to become a SQL Server 2008 expert in the coming months.  Can any of you fine people recommend the best book or other resource for going from the basics to really being a guru?  Again, I’m looking specifically at T-SQL and SQL Server itself.

Blast From the Past: Stuff that Bugs Me

By Nick at November 30, 2012 08:03
Filed Under: General, Blast from the Past, Delphi

I don't know what I ate on April 1, 2006, but apparently it didn't sit well.

  1. Message boxes that ask a Yes/No question, but give you Ok/Cancel buttons.   I mean, come on. If you are asking a "Yes or No" question, how tough is it to tell the dialog to have Yes and No buttons? Not tough at all, that's how tough it is.
  2. Ok buttons that are enabled when a dialog is not properly filled in.   This is basic User Interface design. If pushing a button will result in an error message, don't let the user push the button.
  3. Non-sizable dialogs.  Argh. This one drives me nuts. It's especially galling when there's a list box or something that is so small you feel like you are looking at it through a straw.
  4. Dialogs that don't remember their size and position. Related to the previous item. Sometimes a dialog is too small, and when I size it, I want it to stay sized. Sometimes it blocks stuff I want to see. It should stay where I put it, not where the developer thinks it should go.
  5. Windows that insist on putting themselves in front when I am doing something else. This is absolutely, unequivocally the most irritating thing about Windows. It bugs me more and more each day.  I decide what I am looking at, not some shareware programmer from Wisconsin. If I am typing or otherwise working in a Window, no other application should ever be able to steal the focus, unless it's warning me that my house is on fire or something equally serious. 
  6. File directory trees the size of postage stamps. Related to the issue above. Ever get one of those slightly older applications that won't let you size the directory lookup tree? With ever expanding hard drives and increasingly complex file directory structures, looking at your hard drive through a fixed size treeview that's only 150 pixels square feels like being shoved in the trunk of a Yugo.
  7. Crappy error messages, especially when they are sentences and don't end in a period. "List index out of bounds". Great -- which list? The name or even type of the list is known. Tell us! "Error 332322". This isn't a problem because I have, of course, memorized all the error codes for your application. What's wrong with "In the DoSomething method, the length of the input from the name edit box is too short.  It needs to be at least five characters."  Feel free to write a novel in your error messages. Believe me, no one will complain.
  8. CAPSLOCK keys. The person who thought putting the CAPSLOCK key above the SHIFT key and right below the TAB key should be rubbed vigorously with rough sandpaper and then placed in a bathtub full of lemon juice.
  9. Unnecessary modal dialog boxes that I have to click when it doesn't make any difference. I love these. "You've done something really stupid. Press Ok to continue". Great. Thanks. I couldn't have made it through the day without that totally, utterly meaningless and pointless message.
  10. Dialog boxes that have the negative answer on the left and the positive answer on the right. OK buttons go on the left. Cancel buttons go on the right. Don't put the Delete button on the left and the Approve button on the right. It's a gross violation of the laws of nature.

Stuff I’ve Been Reading #1

By Nick at September 08, 2012 16:33
Filed Under: Software Development, Unit Testing, General, Book Review, Stuff I've Been Reading

I’m Writing a Book

By Nick at September 03, 2012 17:09
Filed Under: Delphi, General, Software Development, Unit Testing

I’ve decided that my first official act as an Embarcadero MVP will be to write a book.

Here’s some details:

  • You can see the outline and a brief discussion here.
  • I’m writing it on LeanPub.  LeanPub is very cool.  They make it very easy for a guy like me to write a book – that is, a guy who doesn’t really know anything about the process of actually producing a book, as opposed to the content in the book.
    • LeanPub outputs to PDF, MOBI, and ePub formats. 
    • Eventually I’ll probably put the book on Lulu or some other on-demand publisher to allow folks to get physical copies if that is what they prefer.
    • You can view the outline on the LeanPub page
    • The book will contain a lot of content from my blog, but of course I’ll enhance and improve that material.  And there will, of course, be a lot of new material.
    • Many of the topics will include the Delphi Spring Framework, DUnit, ,and other cool new frameworks. 
  • I’ve actually been working on the book for a while, but once I saw LeanPub, I knew that I had to make the move official.
  • You can sign up to find out when the book gets published.  You can also tell me how much you are willing to pay for the book. 
  • LeanPub lets you very easily update and enhance the content.  So I’ll probably publish well before I’m done and then update as I go along.
    • This will allow early buyers (who will likely pay a lower price) to provide feedback.  Sort of like a “beta test” program.
    • It will also let me correct mistakes
    • And of course all purchasers will always have access to the latest and greatest version.
  • I’ll naturally incorporate feedback as much as I can.  Your help will make the book better for everyone.
  • I don’t know yet what I’ll charge and when.  That’s another cool feature of LeanPub – I can experiment with the pricing.  A lot of books on LeanPub have a variable, choose-your-own price models.

So I’m pretty excited.  LeanPub really was the catalyst to finally move ahead and make my idea public. 

So give the book a look, sign up to receive updates, and please feel free to provide feedback – I’m interested in what the community has to say.  As long as you are polite and professional, of course.  Winking smile

Honored to be an Embarcadero MVP

By Nick at August 26, 2012 14:35
Filed Under: Delphi, General, Personal

I am honored to be included amongst a rather large list of impressive developers as an Embarcadero MVP for Delphi.  The program is still young, and so I’m not entirely sure what it means to be part of it, but whatever it is, I’m honored and pleased to be included, and I’ll do my best to be worthy of that honor. 

There is already a nice perk to the position – the team at DevJet – about whom I can’t say enough nice things  – have given us free versions of all their products forever. That’s a long time!  This is very cool, as I am a big fan of Document Insight, including the new Enterprise version.

I’m looking forward to seeing where this all goes.  So my thanks to all of you and to Embarcadero.

It's That Time Again: Gateway Ticketing Needs Delphi Developers

By Nick at July 02, 2012 16:05
Filed Under: Delphi, General, Software Development

My company, Gateway Ticketing, is hiring again. We are looking for Delphi developers. Actually, having Delphi skills is great, but we are mostly interested in smart people that know what they are doing when developing high-quality software.  We love Delphi and C#, but in the end, those are just languages and we know that it doesn’t ultimately matter what tool you know, but whether you really know how to write clean code.

Here are some reasons why you should consider working for Gateway:

  • We are a great place to work.  I love it here.  That this is a great place to work was so obvious to me that I moved my whole family clear across the country to join this team. 
  • We are serious about being serious about software development.  We aren’t messing around here.  While we have a large legacy code base, we are all about doing the right thing the right way with the right tools.  We insist on unit tests for your code.  We insist that you keep up with the latest innovations in writing code.  We insist that you view coding the same way that Rembrandt viewed painting.  
  • We love Delphi, and we live and  breathe it here.  We are doing cool things like using the Delphi Spring Framework, Dependency Injection, Unit Testing, and other fun stuff.
  • We use C# and ASP.NET for our eCommerce solution and all the cool stuff that goes along with that.
  • We are located in beautiful Boyertown, Pennsylvania.  This a great place to live and raise a family.  We are close to everything (including Philadelphia) but have that great small town feel.  I love living here, and you will too.
  • Our customers are some of the greatest and most fun places on earth.  We sell systems to the largest amusement parks, zoos, water parks, and museums all over the world.  This is a cool industry.  Who doesn’t love a good amusement park?

Okay, look – everyone says they want to hire “rock-star developers”.  Shoot, even we do it.  That’s all well and good, but the bottom line is that we are setting our standards really high.  And if doing that scares people off, well so be it.  We don’t want people who are scared off by high standards.  We want people who are looking for places with high standards.  We expect and demand your very best – anything less and you should find a job writing VB6 code. ;-) We really are creating a world-class place to build software, and we want folks like you to be a part of it.  You are up for that, right?

Relocation assistance is available.

And of course, here are the obligatory caveats.  We are definitely looking for people to live and work here in the Eastern Pennsylvania/Greater Philadelphia area.  Please note: we aren’t currently considering remote workers.  Naturally, you must be eligible to work in the United States. I'm sorry but right now we cannot sponsor H1B visas. :-(  We don’t care where you are from or who your parents were or what color your dog is or anything like that.  We are really only interested in what you can do.  And of course, we want you to know what we can do for you, too.

If that sounds like something good to you, please contact me.

Comments Working.

By Nick at April 22, 2012 08:27
Filed Under: General

Okay, it looks like comments are working now.  

It seems that my little box of flair (links to Facebook, etc) was causing the problem.  I deleted it for now.

What a bother.

Comments Broken?

By Nick at April 11, 2012 19:05
Filed Under: General

I notice that I haven't had any comments since April 1, and now I've gotten some emails from some of you kind folks pointing out that commenting doesn't work.  

Is that still the case? (Feel free to answer at nickhodges@gmail.com if it is....)

Sorry about that -- I'm not sure what the issue is.

New Blog Theme

By Nick at March 18, 2012 00:41
Filed Under: General

As you  have no doubt noticed, I updated the theme to my blog.  I was never really happy with the one I've had for about a year now, so I tweeked and existing BlogEngine.Net theme to my liking. It appears to be working and looking fine, but l can't test it on all the browsers you people have, so please let me know if you encounter any problems or oddities.  

One problem I am having is getting the lists, especially nested unordered lists, to work right.  Not sure what is going on yet, but I'm learning.  

On Why I Think Twitter is Awesome

By Nick at March 04, 2012 20:57
Filed Under: TechBiz, General, Tech Stuff, Software Development, Delphi

I have this friend who totally doesn’t get Twitter.  He doesn’t get it so much that it actually kind of makes him angry that anyone does get – and like – Twitter.  To him, it is a total waste of time in every way. He can’t imagine why anyone would spend any time at all having anything to do with Twitter.  And that’s fine – to each his own. But I do find it amusing that someone would feel that way about a service used and enjoyed by millions of people. 

I’m a Twitter lover.  I find it entertaining, amusing, interesting, and good for my brain.  I really enjoy reading it, and I really enjoy posting tweets.  I get good news, good development information, and a good laugh when I read twitter.  I get to express my self in short bursts that  help me formulate my thoughts.  What’s not to like?

The common impression is that Twitter is for “letting you know what your friends are doing” – or at least that is how it was originally marketed.  The common misconception is that Twitter is just a bunch of people posting “Now I’m eating lunch.  Yum!”, and perhaps it was that in the very beginning.  But in the spirit of “Let a thousand flowers bloom”, Twitter became a lot more than that.  Twitter is a forum for expressing not only what you are doing, but what you are thinking, what you are watching, what you are reading, and anything things that you are up to.  It is many things.  It is a means of conducting a conversation across the world.  It is a means of sharing information with like minded people .  It can help you track your customers are thinking.  It can be a source of entertainment.  It can ensure you are up to date on the latest news, and it can even help foment a real live revolutions.  Not bad for a site that posts things  140 characters at a time.

Short and Sweet

Here’s the main reason why I like Twitter:  It forces us to express ourselves in short, concise sentences.  140 characters isn’t a lot, but it’s not nothing.  It is sort of real-world application of Strunk & White’s exhortation of “Use fewer words”.   It’s really quite amazing the amount of humor, wisdom, and pith people can cram into that little chunk of text.  Anyone who cruises around the internets knows that, while it allows people to publish openly without the barrier of a publishing house, folks – this blog included – don’t get the benefit of an editor.  Twitter is the one place where you can know that if you read it, you’ll get things in short, concise, crisp chunks.  (And I should add that I pride myself on never using ‘4’ and ‘2’ and other similar shortcuts….)

I find that pleasing as a reader, and valuable as a writer. If I can express my thought in 140 characters, then I know that I’ve really distilled it to the essence of the thought.  For instance, it took a while for me to get Hodges Law down to 140 characters but I did.  (And I also now have the added advantage of it being in a single place that I refer to my awesome idea – as well as showing that I was the first to think of it.  Winking smile  )

The other big reason I like Twitter is that it is an “easy read”.  If I have a few minutes to kill, I can pull out my Kindle and flip through the latest on my Twitter feed. I’ve knocked out more than a few pages of Twitter feeds at the Doctor’s office.  It also is perfect for solving that First World Problem of being bored while, ahem, “indisposed”.

Third reason?  It’s a wealth of information about Delphi and software development.  Many great developers tweet, and point to articles and blog posts that teach and explain about development.  Want to know what the latest Delphi articles are?  Follow DelphiFeeds.   You can’t say it is impossible to know what is going on with Embarcadero – they have a Twitter feed that updates with just about everything going on with the company.  You can tailor your feed to bring you whatever you are interested in.  I’m interested in Software Development, the NBA, specifically the Timberwolves, certain American Idol contestants, and generally funny stuff.  That’s exactly what my feed brings me. 

HashTags

Another feature that is both fun and powerful are hashtags.  As far as I know, the power and coolness of hashtags was actually an invention of the Twitter community and not an original part of the “spec” for Twitter.  According to this article – which is a great history and summary of hashtags -- the idea actually came from a guy named Chris Messina, and his idea has become part of the power of Twitter.  Hashtags are used to create groups or topics.  Sometimes they are fleeting – like a hashtag for the Superbowl – or sometimes they are ongoing, with people constantly adding to them, like the “#overheardathome” tag.  Want to see what others are saying while American Idol is on?  There’s a hashtag for that.  They have even made a difference in world events.  The valiant folks fighting for freedom in the Arab Spring used twitter hashtags to inform the world and each other about important, world-changing events.  Businesses are event starting to include hashtags in their advertisements (and of course, folks aren’t always respectful of those tags…..)  There’s even a website dedicated to tracking the use of hashtags.  From the humble beginnings of an idea from a single users, hashtags have made twitter into a useful and powerful communications medium.

Comedy

It may have started out as a site to tell your friends that you are eating lunch, but Twitter has become a great place for some quick-witted comedy and entertainment.  Heck, I tweet a lot about technology and programming, but I try hard to make a witty, funny comment every once and a while.   Some people’s sense of humor is just made for Twitter.  One of my favorites is Josh Hara.  If you are looking for a series of laugh-out-loud funny, but off-color tweets, look no further than Pauly Peligroso.    There are tons of lists of (allegedly) funny people on Twitter.  I should add that in my experience, the people that are “supposed” to be funny – that is, comedians whose names you know – aren’t really that funny. But hands down, bar none, the funniest feed on Twitter is Sh*tmydadsays.   In any event, Twitter can definitely make you LOL.  (I only use “LOL” when I, well, actually do laugh out loud. You should follow the same rule.)

Parody and History Sites

Another feature that dovetails on the straight comedy sites are some of the excellent parody sites.  There’s a whole slew of Star Wars characters on TwitterLord Voldemort of Harry Potter fame is enormously popular, on topic, and very funny.  He and Severus Snape often exchange barbs.  (Actually, there are quite a few folks tweeting as Severus Snape on Twitter….)  You can keep track of Batman, Drunk Superman, Aquaman  (Warning: he’s a little….”salty”), Spiderman, Drunk Hulk, and just (presumably sober Hulk. (Apparently there are many facets to Hulk’s personality). Want some history? You can follow Henry VIII, Calvin Coolidge,   You can follow the history of the Byzantine Empire, the first 1000 days of the JFK administration, and real-time events of World War II.  And that is just scratching the surface.  Believe me.  There is no end to the inanity, craziness, and imaginativeness of the folks on Twitter. 

In The End

Yes, Twitter would be boring if it were nothing more than people telling you what they were doing.  It may have been that at one point, but it’s become way more than that.  Shoot, a recent cover of Sports Illustrated had a hashtag for the cover article about Jeremy Lin. In the end, Twitter can me what you want it to be.  You can follow technologists, pop stars, actors, authors, characters from books and movies, business, news sites, newspapers, bloggers, family members, humorists, athletes, historical characters, and more.  You can keep up with technology, world events, politics, all manner of news and events, what your favorite authors/actors/singers are up to.  It’s really a huge, fascinating party that you can control to your heart’s content. 

Why anyone wouldn’t be interested in that, I have no idea.

My Amazon Kindle So Far

By Nick at February 12, 2012 06:59
Filed Under: General, Tech Stuff, TechBiz

A while back I wrote about why I got my Amazon Kindle Fire, and in that post I promised you that I’d write about my thoughts about owning the Kindle.  And since I’d rather rub shredded fiberglass in my eyes than break a promise to you fine people, here are my thoughts on owning an Amazon Kindle

  • First, I want to say that I also am an Amazon Prime customer, so what I talk about below may include benefits of being in Amazon Prime.  Those benefits are actually quite numerous considering the $79 annual price tag.  If you are at all involved with Amazon, I’d give the Prime membership a good look.   You can save a lot of postage – and a lot of time and gas – with Amazon Prime.  “Gas, you say? How?”  Well, I’m glad you asked.  Here’s an example:  I don’t drive to the Pet Store anymore, because I just have Amazon ship me – at no charge and with no sales tax – my dog food.  And cat food .  And that is just the beginning of what Prime offers.  I’ll leave it now to say that it’s a pathetically good deal if you have even the remotest notion of buying things from Amazon, and point out some more specific things as I go along.
  • The second point to make is that at $200, the Kindle Fire is pretty much a loss leader for Amazon.  I don’t know for sure what it costs to make the Kindle Fire, but I’m guessing that Amazon is selling them at a loss or very close to it.  And the reason is that the Fire is, in Amazon’s eyes, merely an Amazon content delivery device.  They want to get this device – a Kindle – into your hands. At $200, it’s an attractive tablet that runs Android apps, had a dual core processor, a color screen and has all the advantages of a Kindle.  Sure, any tablet can run Kindle software, but as a Kindle, I  can do things like borrow a free book a month from the Kindle Owners' Lending Library (another Prime perk….) as well as watch Amazon Video (another Prime benefit…) on the device.  I can store all my Kindle content (another Prime benefit….) with unlimited space on the cloud, including magazines, books, and music. 
  • The Kindle Fire is pretty impressive hardware. It is a dual core processor, and a very nice seven inch IPS screen. I haven’t really ever thought that it was slow because of processor power. It seems plenty powerful to me.
  • Things I like to do with a tablet (and that don’t really matter that it’s a Kindle Fire….)
    • Read Twitter.  I’ve taken twitter off my phone because now I can….
    • …actually read the web article on a link from Twitter instead of putting it in Instapaper because my phone makes it too hard to read the link. 
    • Watch movies and TV in bed with a nice, crisp seven inch screen. The Fire is really easy to hold however I like.
    • Play games. The screen is big enough to actually see the cool graphics on some cool games. I’ve taken all games off my phone, and the Fire has become a nice little tool for wasting some time.
  • Things I like to do with my Kindle fire (because it is a Kindle…)

Miscellanea:

  • Nice: One thing I like is the “Lock screen” feature which locks in screen orientation.  Sometimes you want to lie on your side and still read in portrait mode even though you are holding the device in landscape mode.  I like that. I suppose that  other tablets have that – I don’t know – but I do like it’s easy access.
  • Nice: Amazon's Android AppStore gives away a paid app every day.  Mostly it is cheesy games, but every once and a while you can get a nice paid app.  While not the Android Market, you can get many of the apps you want from the Amazon AppStore, including things like NetFlix, Pandora, Evernote, etc. 
  • No Google apps, though.  I guess I’m not 100% clear while Amazon blocks Google apps. I guess they view them as a competitor. I sure would like to be able to run Google Mail and Google Calendar on it. I also prefer Google Music, but Amazon’s music is workable. It is a bummer not to have the Google/Tablet connection.
  • To add insult to injury regarding the above note, there really isn’t even a decent third-party calendar app in Amazon’s store. Alas.
  • Bummer: The device has no camera, no microphone,  and no GPS.  This is okay, because the GPS on my phone works much better when I’m driving.  The camera on my phone is as good as any they’d put on the tablet.  I pretty much have my phone with me all the time, so those missing features in the Fire aren’t a problem. 
  • Bummer:  The Kindle Fire runs Android, but it is a very customized and restricted version of Android.  As a result, the device has no Google apps, including no access to the Google Market.    However, if you want, you can root it (though if you do, you lose the ability to watch free Amazon Prime videos).  You can then sideload the Google apps.   You can sideload apps without root access, but it is a bit of a crap shoot whether any given app will work.  (Here’s a good open letter to Jeff Bezos on this topic, the general sentiment of which I support.  I don’t’ regret my Kindle purchase, but it would be a really, really awesome tool if I had the Google stuff on it.)
  • A Bit Strange: There is only one physical button on the whole device:  the power switch on the bottom.  This means no volume rockers, which Android users are kind of used to, I guess.  It hasn’t bothered me too much, but I know that it is something that bothers other users.
  • Bummer:  Amazon advertises their custom Android Silk browser as “lightening fast”, but my experience has been, uhm, different.
  • Nice to Know: I have kept my device “Kindle-ized”, but if I wanted to, there are Android ROM’s available for the Kindle Fire if I wanted to move the device to be a “pure” tablet.  But again, I’d lose the advantages in Amazon Prime of the device being a Kindle.

Final verdict:  I’m happy with my Kindle Fire – I like using and having a tablet – but I’m going to save up an buy a “real” tablet in the fall.  I’m interested in the Google Nexus Tablet – or at least in concept.  I like having a Nexus phone, and I’d like to have the same thing in a tablet.

…Wherein I Rant Vigorously About Mobile Twitter Clients

By Nick at February 05, 2012 00:23
Filed Under: TechBiz, Tech Stuff, General, Delphi

I am now going to go on a rant about Twitter clients – mobile Twitter clients in particular (though some desktop clients are rant-worthy as well).  I am going to do this because I can’t understand why they are such a pain in the ass and work so badly, when they could so easily work so well.

Okay, first, don’t get me wrong.  I really like Twitter.  (If you want, you can follow me, I’m @nickhodges --  no surprise in that handle, eh?)  I like it because it’s a great place to keep up on news, find interesting articles, read funny stuff, and to post your thoughts in short, pithy statements of 140 characters or less.  It’s also a great time killer.  If you are waiting at the doctors office, it’s a much better way to pass the wait than looking at a two and a half year old copy of People Magazine.  It’s interesting, fun, never the same thing twice, and frankly, I’m a little addicted.  I do almost all of my twitter reading on my phone or on my wonderful Amazon Kindle

But yet reading Twitter on my mobile devices drives. me. crazy.  When it comes to mobile Twitter clients, I’m not addicted -- I’m inflamed with a rage that burns like the heat of a thousand suns.

I’ve tried just about every one out there. They all drive me insane.  And so here is  my rant:

  • A twitter client should never, ever, ever, under any circumstances, for any reason, at any time, ever, ever, EVER move my “cursor”.  EVER. And by “cursor” I mean my location in my Twitter stream.  I determine where my cursor goes, not you, you blasted twitter client that thinks you can just show me whatever you want when you want to.  If I am reading Twitter on my phone, leave off on a funny Pauly Peligroso post, go away to another app, and then I come back, you darn well better have my twitter client looking right at that same stinking Pauly Peligroso post when I come back.  I don’t care if I’ve been gone for five minutes, five hours or five years, you flipping better have your cursor right there where I Ieft it. Not anywhere else.  Where. I. left. it.  Leave a gap if you have to. I don’t care, just leave it. Don’t try to do me a favor and “catch me up”.  If I need catching up, I’ll get myself caught up. Give me an option to get caught up, fine.  But for the love of Adam Sandler, DON’T MOVE MY POSITION IN MY TWITTER STREAM.   Ever,  ever, ever, never, ever, ever. 
  • Second, if you tell me that there are “143 new tweets”, and I say “Great, some new tweets”, put me at the freaking START of the 143 new tweets, not at the current time!!!!   Why in the name of sweet baby Dick Van Dyke would I ever, ever, ever what to start at the most recent tweet out of those 143 new tweets? Why would you tell me that there are 143 new tweets and then start me out at the point where there are zero new tweets? Why do I open up the fracking client and see some tweet from three seconds ago, when I want to read the 143 new tweets?  Why do I have to manually scroll down and try to figure out where the new tweets start?  What is that, some kind of sick, twisted joke?  Really?  I have to scroll?  Seriously?   I mean this is basically a variation of the “Never move my cursor spot”, but come on, this is ridiculous.
  • Third – stop trying to shorten my shortened URL’s.  I’m smart – I can shorten my URL’s myself.  It’s nice you want to do that for me, but at least let me opt out of it.  Nothing says “wasted time and resources” as a link that is a Twitter shortened version of a bit.ly link that started out as a tinyurl.com link.  I mean, come on, I can keep my twitter posts under 140 characters myself.  I don’t want your help.  I don’t need your help.  Stop it.

Bottom line: Mobile twitter clients stink and they make me want to bash public monuments with a sledgehammer. (I’d never do that, really, but I want to when I go back from checking my mail and the stupid TweetCaster moves me to  a tweet that was posted 23 seconds ago.)

Phew, okay, I feel better now.

What I've Been Reading

By Nick at January 28, 2012 10:34
Filed Under: Book Review, General, Personal

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The views I express here are entirely my own and not necessarily those of any other rational person or organization.  However, I strongly recommend that you agree with pretty much everything I say because, well, I'm right.  Most of the time. Except when I'm not, in which case, you shouldn't agree with me.

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