Amazon.com Widgets August 2012

Honored to be an Embarcadero MVP

By Nick at August 26, 2012 05:35
Filed Under: Delphi, General, Personal

I am honored to be included amongst a rather large list of impressive developers as an Embarcadero MVP for Delphi.  The program is still young, and so I’m not entirely sure what it means to be part of it, but whatever it is, I’m honored and pleased to be included, and I’ll do my best to be worthy of that honor. 

There is already a nice perk to the position – the team at DevJet – about whom I can’t say enough nice things  – have given us free versions of all their products forever. That’s a long time!  This is very cool, as I am a big fan of Document Insight, including the new Enterprise version.

I’m looking forward to seeing where this all goes.  So my thanks to all of you and to Embarcadero.

Flotsam and Jetsam #63

By Nick at August 23, 2012 20:38
Filed Under: Delphi, Flotsam and Jetsam

Flotsam and Jetsam #62

By Nick at August 22, 2012 08:36
Filed Under: Flotsam and Jetsam, Software Development, Delphi
  • Okay, so it looks like the release of Delphi XE3 is imminent.  My friend Tim Del Chiaro (the Delphi Insider) has announce the World Tour for the release.  The official page is here.  Tim also mentions something about a new product “HTML5 Builder”.  That sounds interesting.
  • JT, the Product Manager for RAD Studio, has a blog post with more info. I’ve not dabbled much in mobile development yet, so the most interesting part was “by adding memory management features such as automatic reference counting” – that’s very intriguing.  This could add a whole new dimension to the great FreeAndNil debateWinking smile
  • I’m always looking to sell stuff on ebay – so when I put in my new ASUS RT-N16 router, I thought I’d sell the old one.  Apparently, I’m not the only one doing that, as the router that Comcast gave me is worth only about 15 dollars, if that.  They are $40 at Amazon. Oh well.  Winking smile  I was hoping it was worth a bit more.  But hey, $15 is a lot of money, right?
  • I think I’ve said at least 453 times how much I love FinalBuilder.  So I’m always happy to pass along good news about what the folks at VSoft are up to.  Their latest is a very intriguing product called Continua CI, recently released in beta.  It’s a follow on to their FinalBuilder Server product.  I say “follow on” and not “upgrade” because it looks to be something quite a bit different and improved. Robert Love has a good write-up on it as well.    We here at Gateway Ticketing currently use Jenkins in concert with FinalBuilder, but if the licensing for Continua is favorable, it might be something for us to consider.  In any event, I always recommend looking at anything at all from the fine folks at vSoft Technologies.

Cool New Tool: Delphi Code Coverage

By Nick at August 18, 2012 10:27
Filed Under: Delphi, Software Development, Unit Testing

Code Coverage is an interesting topic – Wikipedia defines it as “the degree to which the source code of a program has been tested.”  The idea is that you want to measure what percentage of the lines of code in your application are executed when you run your test suite.  The “perfect” test suite would execute every single line of code in your codebase.  Being able to definitively measure that goes a long way towards validating your testing suite and giving you confidence that your tests are thorough and testing everything that needs to be tested.

So I was really happy to run across the Delphi Code Coverage tool. I was intrigued and interested, so I downloaded it and gave it a look. And I really liked it.  I decided to run it through its paces by checking the code coverage of the unit tests for my THTMLWriter project. It didn’t take me long to figure out how to use it.   It’s written by Christer Fahlgren.  He blogged about it back in 2010.  It has a couple of other committers, and it’s been an active project throughout out 2012

The project includes this note: “The 1.0 release was made possible through the generous support of DevFactory.” I thought that was cool, and so I encourage you to go to their website and check out their services.

Some things to note off the bat:

So what did I do?  Well, first I pulled the source to make sure I had it.  Then, I went ahead and downloaded the RC7 build, which has one file in it:  codecoverage.exe.  I took that file and put it in a folder along my path so I can call it wherever I need it.

Then, I read the nice simple documentation.  I was just testing it out, so I ran everything manually via the IDE just to see how it all worked.  Eventually, you’d want to integrate this into your continuous integration. So here is a quick rundown of what I did and what I found. 

First, I opened up the project options for my THTMLWriter unit test application and told the Linker to create a MAP file for the project when I build it. The tools uses the MAP file to trace all the code paths that the application under test uses.

Next, I looked for the appropriate command  line switches. 

  • I used it –e switch to name the executable that would run. 
  • I used the –m switch to name the *.map file.
  • I used the –u switch to tell the tool what code unit I wanted analyzed.  Note that the switch wants the unit name, not the file name.  You can list as many units as you want after this switch.  Alternatively, you can use the –uf switch to point to a text file that has a list of unit names (one per line) to be examined.  In my case, I’m interested in the code coverage for the uHTMLWriter.pas unit.
  • I used the –html switch to indicate that I wanted the output to be an HTML file.  This would make it easier for me to look at the results in this “by hand” method of running things. 

The resulting command line was as follows:

codecoverage -e HTMLWriterTestAppTests.exe -m HTMLWriterTestAppTests.map -u uHTMLWriter -html

Note that the above command line assumes that the current directory of your command prompt is the directory where the files in question are located.  I actually put the command line in a small batch file in the same directory.

So then I executed the command.  The tool popped up the GUI Runner for DUnit, I pressed the Run button, the tests ran, and when they were done, the tool finished up and produced some output in the form of an HTML file.  (It also provided a FastMM dialog at the end of its run, which took a few seconds to appear).

image

As noted, the result was two HTML files -- one summary file:

image

and a file that shows me the coverage for the uHTMLWriter unit.  That has a header in it that tells me that I have 98% code coverage.  Not bad!

image

But the real fun part is that the file contains a complete listing of the unit, color-coded to indicate which lines were executed (in green) and which weren’t (in purple). So 2% of my code isn’t covered?  So I scanned the file and came across this:

image

Looks like I never wrote a unit test for the OpenLabel method that takes a string parameter.  (I have one for the parameter-less OpenLabel).  Okay, so I went back, wrote a unit test for that one, and re-ran the code coverage tool, and now I have code coverage for that method:

image

 

Nice!  The tool also pointed out that I don’t test that a number of exceptions get properly raised, so I’ll get working on those, too.  I’d like to be able to run the report and have it return 100% for my coverage. 

Overall, this is a nice and powerful tool to help you make sure that your unit tests really are running every line of code in whatever you are unit testing.  It’s another great contribution to the Delphi community.  Thanks, Christer.

Flotsam and Jetsam #61

By Nick at August 11, 2012 06:54
Filed Under: Flotsam and Jetsam, Delphi, Tech Stuff
  • I’ve never been a hardware or network geek, but after I read this post by Jeff Atwood about how easy it was to set up custom firmware on a router a few notches above the “cheap one they basically give you when you sign up for cable internet”, I thought that I might try it some day.  I put the Atwood-recommended Asus RT-N16 on my Amazon wish list, and lo and behold, my parents kindly gave it to me for my birthday in July.  I actually left it sitting on the shelf for a few weeks, unsure if I really wanted to use it until a friend at work told me about Ooma.  Ooma is a phone service that works over your internet connection.  It’s not true VOIP, but similar.  Once you buy the device and get it set up, you basically get free phone service (I guess you pay some taxes or something each month, but only like $4 or something).  The Ooma should save me $50 a month.  Nice.  Anyway, if you have an Ooma, you really need a router that supports Quality of Service so that your phone calls don’t get aced out when your 13 year old starts downloading some huge game or something.  So today, I broke out the router, and used these instructions to flash the firmware on the Asus router, and now I’m up and running with TomatoUSB.  Very cool.   My next step is to buy the Ooma box and get that set up.  I’ll keep you all posted, as I know that you are eager to be updated on every single little thing I do.
  • You know, I just love all the stuff that the folks at DevJet are doing.  First, they are the impetus behind the Delphi Spring Framework, which as far as I am concerned you should treat like part of the Delphi RTL, as well as the really cool tool Documentation Insight.  Now they have release a new product that is the mirror to Documentation Insight – Documentation Generator.   You can pre-order it for 30% off, too.  What does it do?  Well, it takes all those great /// comments/documentation you wrote using Documentation Insight (which, by the way, is bundled with Delphi XE2) and turns it into online content.  For instance, here is the documentation for my HTMLWriter project.  And of course, all the documentation for the Spring4D project is online as well.  Nice.
  • There are some interesting Delphi book projects in the works:
  • Nick’s Opinion of the Week:  I think that if someone wants to open source their software, then they should do so.  And if they don’t want to open source their software, then they shouldn’t. And if you have a different opinion than the author of the software, then you should express it respectfully.  If your “advice” isn’t taken, then you should leave it be.  Just sayin’. 

How Not To Code #2: Don’t Use Boolean Method Parameters

By Nick at August 04, 2012 04:16
Filed Under: Delphi, How Not To Code

Okay, let’s start off with a question.  What do you think this little code snippet does?

begin
  ProcessCustomerInput(False);
end;

Well, I’ll bet your first guess is that it processes customer input.  Good guess!  But what the heck does that False there mean?  It’s a parameter, and presumably it means something is, well, false, or that you don’t want the ProcessCustomerInput to do something, but how can you know?  You can’t.

Using Boolean parameters means that lose information for the reader of your code.  A Boolean parameter communicate nothing about the purpose or meaning of the parameter being passed.  Is False good or bad?  Safe or not safe?  Who knows?  Just as above, you can’t figure out at all what the parameter is supposed to mean or do if all you see is True or False

So if you see that in code, the first thing you’ll probably do is to go to the method declaration, and if the parameter is well named, you might figure out what the parameter does:

procedure ProcessCustomerInput(aKeepDuplicates: Boolean);

So there you go, now you know what the Boolean parameter does – apparently it tells you whether to keep the duplicates or not.  That’s great, but the original coder may not always be so kind and clear.  So if you must use a Boolean parameter, at least make the parameter name descriptive. 

Okay, I take it back – don’t actually ever use a Boolean parameter.  Instead, here’s what I suggest would make for much clearer code:

type
  TKeepDuplicates = (DoKeepTheDuplicates, DoNotKeepTheDuplicates);

procedure ProcessCustomerInput(aKeepDuplicates: TKeepDuplicates);
begin
  ....
end;

and that way you can call

begin
  ProcessCustomerInput(DoNotKeepTheDuplicates);
end;

And then your code is eminently readable and clear without having to look up the method declaration.

In addition, this way of doing things is expandable.  If your business rules change, and a third way of processing customer input appears, your code is ready.  With a Boolean parameter, you are stuck with the two options of True and False.

Easy to read, clear, and ready for the future.  Just like code should be.

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The views I express here are entirely my own and not necessarily those of any other rational person or organization.  However, I strongly recommend that you agree with pretty much everything I say because, well, I'm right.  Most of the time. Except when I'm not, in which case, you shouldn't agree with me.